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Easter Weaving Room
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Information about Easter Weaving Room

4.5
18 Google reviews
Type
Cultural attractions
Location
Easter Weaving, Easter Road, Baguio, Benguet, Philippines
Opening Hours
Monday: 8:00 AM – 5:00 PM; Tuesday: 8:00 AM – 5:00 PM; Wednesday: 8:00 AM – 5:00 PM; Thursday: 8:00 AM – 5:00 PM; Friday: 8:00 AM – 5:00 PM; Saturday: 8:00 AM – 5:00 PM; Sunday: Closed
Distance From City Center
472 m
High Season
Spring
Family Friendly
No
Average rating
4.5
Number of reviews
18

Easter Weaving Room

Established in 1909 (making it as old as the city itself), the Easter Weaving Room was an addition to the Easter School that was built two years prior by the Episcopalians, initially only for Bontoc boys. However, Deaconess Anne Hargreaves opened its doors to the Bontoc women, with the idea of teaching them weaving as a means of living. Nowadays, the Room lets in visitors to witness Bontoc women who are expert weavers create colorful fabric from simple threads and use it to create products that can be used at home or worn every day. 

World War II destruction and its Restoration

The Easter Weaving Room as well as the looms and other equipment were part of the collateral damage during World War II. Fortunately, and with the help of women who worked for the room prior the war, the room was reestablished in 1948. Today, Easter School has expanded to be Easter College, and the Easter Weaving Room is now in a building specifically designed for housing several upright looms and was made accessible to the main road so that the public may visit it without needing to enter the campus anymore.

From Placemats to Priest Stoles

Handicrafts created with fabric weaved by Bontoc women have a wide variety, from housewares like placemats, napkins, hand towels, wall hangings, Church vestments including altar covers and priest stoles, men and ladies wear, bags, shoes, accessories, to native costumes of Cordilleran tribes for both genders. More than 40% of their products are bought by foreign buyers from US, Australia, Canada, and Saudi Arabia. Other than weaved products, woodcarvings, rattan and paper baskets or bags, coconut decors, local oil paintings, and local food delicacies are also made available in the room to suit the requests of walk-in guests. More than the products however, what keeps the Easter Weaving Room thriving throughout the years is allowing the public to appreciate the beauty of the Cordilleran tradition of hand weaving and letting them hear the stories from the friendly Bontoc women while they work as well.